Sweet Servuction: Discovering the Business Behind a Corn Maze

By Ali Fisher

Halloween is a time filled with costumes, candy, and corn mazes. The Dean’s Student Leadership Council decided that visiting a local maze would be a fun first outing to work on team building and to have a little fall fun.

As we approached the line for the corn maze, we noticed a sign, “Corn Maze – Your Future Business.” Until that Saturday, the idea of owning a corn maze had never crossed my mind; however, when accompanied by a group of business students and a wait time of nearly 45 minutes, the conversation quickly went in that direction. Here’s what we determined after reflecting on our experience:

Your experience as a corn maze customer is a result of four components, known as the Servuction Model.

SModel

Other customers. By separating customers into smaller groups, it exposes consumers to two things —emotional behavior and bottlenecks. Before explaining that this buildup of people creates unnecessary time constraints, let’s examine the three types of emotional behavior exhibited from customers at corn mazes:

  • Emotional Involvement: These consumers are invested in the experience, actively engaging to prolong activity, and enjoying suspenseful areas throughout the maze.
  • Emotional Expressiveness: These are consumers who might scream, yell, or maybe even laugh outwardly to perceived scary and suspenseful events. Other consumers in this category may regret spending money on such childish activity and express regret in superficial emotion.
  • Emotional Intelligence: These consumers might as well give you a tour of the maze. They know when and where a service personnel is going to jump out and attempt to scare you. They can easily control their ability to be scared, but may take the fun out of the experience.

cornBottlenecks. Have you ever gotten stuck behind a group of slow individuals just when you were starting to figure out the right path? These are the bottlenecks. And this buildup of people is bound to impact your experience, according to the Servuction Model. They slow your experience right when you are on the edge of your triumphant finish. Is that the dilemma of the owner of the maze, or is it your problem? The company might want to consider making wider paths, admitting fewer people into the maze at once, increasing acreage and therefore expanding the maze, or reviewing the maze patterns to filter consumers in different areas using service personnel as key influencers.

Servicescape. This refers to the environment designed for the service. It includes two features — ambient conditions and physical evidence.

  • Ambient Conditions: Includes features such as the lighting, temperature, smells, sights, music, etc., by providing fog lights, ghost music, and increasing the specific aromas such as apple cider, the servicescape adds to the service experience of the consumer.
  • Physical Evidence: Encompasses features like signs, symbols, and artifacts. Objects such as the ticket booth, the website, and the design on the tickets need to clearly convey and enhance the maze operations; otherwise, discrepancies between the message provided and the message received may be a result of the servicescape.

Servicescape varies between corn mazes, but overall the components should seek to clearly align with the mission of the corn maze. Use this as an opportunity to set consumer expectations from the very beginning.

Service Personnel. This is what keeps people coming back and spreads positive word of mouth for a corn maze. If employees are not in character and do not scare customers, then they do not effectively accomplish the service paid for by consumers. Do they live by the mission of the organization? Do they live up to the level of fear one could expect when experiencing the maze? Service personnel not only interact with the consumers, but serve as an important source for product differentiation.

Organization and Systems. The rules, regulations, and processes implemented behind the scenes determine whether or not consumers will have a positive experience. This includes the proficiency of finances and how they are managed, whether or not human resource areas are controlled, the level of organization in the company’s systems, and performance standards that are in place. These components are not visible to the consumer, though they have a significant effect on consumers’ service experience.

With these four concepts in mind, consumers form perceptions regarding their corn maze experience. Are they satisfied, based on their expectations coming into the corn maze? As an owner, if you create a positive service experience,influential word of mouth, and buzz marketing campaigns, you can increase revenue as a result of increased customers.

Through this experience, I learned that business principles can be applied to everything – even corn mazes. With the right team and the right tools, any venture can be a successful one.

Special thanks to Marketing Professor, Doug Hoffman, for showing us all the power of servuction.

Happy Halloween, Business Rams!

The College of Business presents: The Interview of Horror

 

by Tim Pate

HalloweenBuster had recently graduated from college, and he was ready to make it big in the real world. He had been highly successful during his four years at school, and he knew that he had a lot to offer his future employer. After browsing through the local paper for job openings, he found a company hiring for an entry level position in his field of interest. He sent the company his resume and cover letter, and was lucky enough to be granted an interview the following week. Little did he know that he was headed straight for what would prove to be one of the most terrifying experiences of his young life…

On the morning of his interview, Buster peered through squinted eyes at his alarm clock only to find that it had never gone off. His interview was only 30 minutes away, and he had no time to shave or shower. He hastily donned the first dress shirt he found in his closet, neglected to select a tie, kicked on a pair of tennis shoes, and sprinted out the door and into his car. His hair in a state and his breath quite foul, he started the engine and raced to the interview.

Despite his hustle, Buster arrived at the company’s offices five minutes after the interview was scheduled to start. He tried to flatten the wrinkles in his shirt and to press down his unruly hair, but his efforts garnered no results. He caught the elevator to the company’s floor, all the while trying to calm his rapidly beating heart, and then stepped out to greet the receptionist.

The receptionist summoned the interviewer, a well-dressed and confident-looking woman from the HR department, who arrived with an all-too-obvious air of frustration to meet Buster. She greeted him briefly and ushered him into a conference room, where he sat and faced the woman.

The company for which Buster was interviewing was well-known in the area, so Buster had neglected to do any research the week prior to his interview. He figured he knew as much as anyone else about the company, and elected not to worry about analyzing the company thoroughly. Buster was then surprised when the interviewer started asking him about specific business practices of the company and how the company had interacted with certain clients. Buster had no way of relating to the questions that the interviewer was posing to him, so he instead blabbed about himself in an effort to demonstrate his own credibility. Like water flowing over a boulder in a river bed, Buster’s words gushed from his mouth but failed to move the interviewer.

At the end of the interview, Buster was asked if he had any questions for the interviewer. His mind still in a tizzy from the disastrous proceedings of the previous 45 minutes, Buster shook his head no and thanked the interviewer for her time. He stood up, shook her hand, and walked out of the office without saying another word. The receptionist said goodbye, but Buster ignored this nicety as well.

In his car, Buster punched the steering wheel in frustration. How had he been so foolish? Why hadn’t he taken the opportunity more seriously? He started the car and tried to forget the whole experience. This was a day he never wanted to relive. By the time he arrived back at home, he was thinking of his plans for the night, as he was sure that he could use some fun to wash the taste of the interview from his mouth.

A stack of thank-you letters lay unopened, untouched, and unused on the desk in his bedroom. He never heard from the company again…

THE END

Happy Halloween!