A Different Kind of Relationship Building for February 14th

By Natalie Hansen

Valentine’s Day is quickly approaching and your time is probably spent thinking about what to do for that special someone. If you’re single, maybe you’re more focused on taking the day for yourself. Regardless of your love life status, as a business student you should take this time to reflect on a different type of relationship – the kind that sets you up for success.

You’ve probably heard the phrase “it’s all about who you know” more times than you’d like to remember. Cliché or not, it’s true – your education and work ethic are your solid (and necessary) foundation, but your network is how you eventually land that dream job, according to LinkedIn. Take this Valentine’s Day to implement the top five ways the CSU College of Business has developed to strengthen your network and lay the groundwork for your future:

1) Send “thank you” cards to professors, supervisors and other professionals who have helped you grow.

Networking expands your support system.

You’ve hopefully been able to use your college career to build relationships and find mentors whomyou admire. It’s not only about who you know – it’s also about who THEY know. Professors you’ve connected with, bosses who taught you valuable skills, and professionals you’ve met through classes and recruitment events all know numerous other people who may be your ticket to a great job. These are also the folks you want on your side when it comes time to ask for letters of recommendation. Choose a few who’ve made a great impact on you, and send a thank you card letting them know how they’ve helped you. Try for a hand-written note instead of an email. They’ll remember you and be willing to put in a good word for you when you need it.

2) Learn how to use LinkedIn to your advantage and update your profile.

LinkedIn is a necessity in your social media repertoire. Even when you have a steady job, maintaining your LinkedIn page can connect you with numerous other professionals. Those leaders you sent thank you cards to? Make sure you’ve added them on LinkedIn, and ask for a recommendation on your page. Use the site’s tools to upload examples of your work to your profile. Undercover Recruiter recommends staying active in groups and discussions, having a professional (no bathroom pictures, no pictures with pets) photo, and personalizing your URL.

3) Bring treats to work on Friday and show appreciation to co-workers.

Valentine’s Day is a source of major sales for the candy industry – Business Insider notes that Americans will spend over a billion dollars on sugar and chocolate this week. Use the excuse to indulge and bring treats to share with your co-workers. Co-workers can often be valuable references when applying for jobs. When they have a successful career, they’ll be able to connect you to valuable resources. Show your co-workers how much you appreciate them and make an impression by bringing in cookies, candy or baked goods (bonus points if they’re homemade).

4) Take care of yourself.

Taking time to de-stress is important; it can help make sure you’re in top form for your classes, internship, job and networking events. If you’ve been wanting to splurge on a massage, now is a great time. The Student Recreation Center has some affordable options. You can also treat yourself to weekend excursion out of town, extra time at the gym, your favorite dessert or even just some alone time with a good book. Whatever it is, carve out some time to relax.

5) Learn how to talk to recruiters on Thursday, Feb.13.

Students and recruiters mingle at the 2014 Spring Job and Internship Expo.

Knowing how to present yourself to recruiters and potential employers can be intimidating. You only get one chance at a first impression. Understanding how to put your best foot forward is important. The College of Business Career Management Center is offering some tips this Thursday, Feb. 13th. Learn how to talk to the companies and recruiters that visit campus at the Bohemian Auditorium in Rockwell Hall West from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

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As business students, the relationships you have in your network can make all the difference in your career. During this holiday for relationships, make time this week for your professional connections. What networking tips and tricks have you discovered?

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How Studying Abroad Changed my Perspective on Communication

Guest Post By: Ali Fisher

Ali in Prague

First day in Prague

June 19, 2013 was the first time I needed a translator. I had arrived in Prague, Czech Republic to begin my summer education abroad experience through the Colorado State University’s Central and Eastern European Studies Program.  I had no idea what any of the signs said, what the numbers meant, or what social norms were encouraged for effective communication. Before my arrival, I had the privilege of speaking only English and had successfully communicated with nearly everyone in the United States. I had never been challenged to learn another language or taught the keys to communicating with people of different cultures. Reflecting on my experience as an English-speaking individual in a non-English speaking country, here are a few tips for those of you who plan to travel abroad.

Understand that people generally want to help you. 

When I registered at the University of Economics dormitory, the advisor’s response immediately indicated that she did not know English. I had been told that citizens would tell me that in order divert conversation barriers. In need of keys, contracts, and program information, I initially regretted not studying in an English speaking country; however, she went out of her way to pull up Google translator to communicate with me via computer. Throughout my education abroad experience, I encountered this same experience in restaurants, the university, the public transportation system and various locations outside the capital. I learned that if you take the time and brainstorm resources to understand one another, foreign-to-you language speakers will try to be of assistance.

Don’t assume everyone will adapt to your language. 

ali2

Kaufland Shopping Center

It was very easy to assume Czech speakers would try to understand me, but I quickly realized that I needed to understand their language as well. This required knowledge of Czech words, which I had zero background with. I invested in a small dictionary and would learn a few words every night. In the three weeks that I was there, I obviously did not become fluent, but it helped to show Czech speakers that I wanted to understand them. It made it even more helpful when shopping at “Kaufland,” the local market. All the food packaging was written in Czech, making milk even difficult to locate. One time my roommate and I purchased yogurt as a mistake because it was packaged in the shape of a milk carton. Since the store did not accommodate English speakers, we were unable to purchase our desired item and have made the similar mistake on various occasions.

Use gestures for further clarification.

I learned that communicating involves more than talking. The uses of pointing, hand expressions, and facial reactions have sometimes been the most effective. I was in the train station in Venice, Italy, for a weekend trip when I realized I had no idea where I was going. With my address and map in hand, locals were able to draw out which route was most appropriate. Being approachable and open to alternative conversation methods enabled me to connect with German-, French-, Deutsche-, Italian-, Croatian-, and Czech-speaking individuals while abroad.

 Be patient.

First day of school

It took studying abroad to realize how impatient I have been when overcoming language barriers in the United States. When I didn’t understand someone, it was almost guaranteed that someone close by could help me. But while abroad, this wasn’t likely. During school, I was challenged to present a business plan in a group of Spanish-speaking and French-speaking students. We experienced three language barriers and a set time limit, which led to frustration. After multiple attempts to finalize our project layout, we realized lack of patience in understanding each other’s goal was the only thing hindering our success. Allow time to understand one another before initiating action.

Studying abroad gave me a deeper understanding of the definition of communication. I have learned that English is not the only way to communicate with others. Differences in communication styles, culture, and language can produce barriers, but through patience, you can overcome them.

 

Save the Date: July 24th come visit our table at The Lagoon Concert Series

By: Natalie Hansen

One of the best things about Fort Collins is that most nights of the week, you can find live music somewhere around Old Town.  The Lagoon Summer Concert Series is a free event entering its 18th year of bringing local musicians to campus. Each Wednesday from July 9th to August 14th, from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., a different genre of music is featured, including everything from country to 80s pop. If you are in Fort Collins this summer, the Lagoon Summer Concert Series is a great opportunity to get outside and enjoy music, without spending money.

Image

Photo by Annie Burnham

The stage is set just west of the lagoon, making it a perfect spot to relax in the shade away from the heat of the Colorado summer.  Evenings during the summer are normally a bit breezier, so concert goers should be able to kick back and take in the show.  There is plenty of space in the grass to bring a group of friends, your dog, a blanket, and a picnic dinner. Free parking is available after 4 p.m. nearby in the parking lot behind Morgan Library, but you can also access the event by walking or riding a bike – another chance to soak up the sun before classes start again in six weeks.

You’ll also find a variety of local organizations sponsoring tables during the concert series, as well as some of the colleges here at CSU. The College of Business, Extension, and The College of Agricultural Sciences will be hosting tables on Wednesday, July 24th. From 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., we will be out enjoying the sunshine and music from the Tumbling Dice, a high energy country band from Denver. The group promises to be a hit with dance and music lovers of all kinds and will be a fun way to unwind in the middle of your week. We also have some surprises in store for those of you planning to stop by the concert – we’ll have swag, popcorn, and even a photo booth to capture some of your summer memories.

We’re looking forward to seeing you by the lagoon!

A Sendoff to the Class of 2013

By Tim Pate

College of Business graduates enjoy commencement

College of Business graduates enjoy commencement

This week’s post (by virtue of the title alone) runs the risk of being a bit sappy and sentimental, so I’ll do my best to keep it professional. You all have probably shed and seen enough tears for all the graduation hullabaloo,  and I don’t intend to contribute to the melancholy any more than I have to. That being said, here begins my blog post reflecting on my time as an undergraduate student at Colorado State University.

Two weeks ago, I sat in my room, putting the final touches on a school project, when I realized that the work I was completing was not just another college project – it was the final project. When it was done, there would be no more. For some reason, this simple fact hit me harder than all the well-wishings and congratulations I had received from family and friends in the preceding days and weeks. And suddenly I began to cherish that last project – I began to enjoy it.

This insignificant experience gave way to my realization of how representative my final project was of the conclusion of my college experience. Under any other circumstances, that project would have been just another part of college life – another small hurdle on my way to the finish line. On some level, I think that’s how I’ve viewed too much of my college experience. The classes, the events, the involvement, the mishaps were all part of a means to a grander end.

What this last project taught me was that I need to remember to take the time to appreciate those stepping stones that lead to the ultimate finale. Those awkward roommate situations freshman year; the nights spent in Old Town; the class presentations; the once-in-a-lifetime extracurricular events – all of these things were special in their own right.

Looking forward, I know that I will have the opportunity to take advantage of more small moments that culminate in something big. Life in the real world appears a bit daunting – I’ll admit that – and I know that I’m going to fail a few times before I find what works for me. However, I’m going to try to do my best to make my failings and my successes count and to take the time to acknowledge them individually.

There are a lot of naysayers out there who don’t believe in the potential of our generation. I think they’re wrong. I think that we’re going to make a difference that probably none of us can even foresee at the moment. But I hope that whatever happens along the way, we do our best to appreciate the little things that lead to whatever changes we make. I’m going to try to start appreciating those mundane class projects like I did the last one.

Congratulations to the Class of 2013!

Ben Hilzer on the Business of Theater and the Theatrics of Business

by Tim Pate

As you may have gleaned from this blog, I’m quite proud of the College of Business, from which I am earning a minor in business administration. However, I am also delighted to be a part of the College of Liberal Arts, where I am earning my degree in Journalism and Technical Communication. Both Colleges have incredible academic programs, and they each host activities and events that enhance the college experience for their students.

Ben Hilzer
Image credit: Ben Hilzer

Enter Ben Hilzer, a junior accounting and finance student in the College of Business, who lives at the intersection of these two colleges. In addition to being a fervent business student, Hilzer is also a self-proclaimed thespian and played the character “Jake” in Colorado State University’s production of “Evil Dead: The Musical.” I saw the R-rated show on opening night and laughed myself to tears. Hilzer’s character is a tobacco-spittin’ hillbilly with surprisingly good singing abilities, and he was one of the highlights of the show.

Hilzer’s Twitter feed is an eclectic combination of his thoughts on business, theater, sports, and music. He displays such enthusiasm for these areas of his life; I knew his perspective would be an interesting one for this blog. So, I caught up with Hilzer a couple days ago to talk about his unique dedication to business and the arts. Here is our exchange:

TP: What has being in Evil Dead taught you about business, and vice versa?

BH: Being in “Evil Dead: The Musical,” as well as theater in general, has shown me the distinct overlap between business and theater. Most notably, the importance of your personal brand. In business, we try to develop our personal brand for job interviews and career building; similarly in theater, your personal brand is crucial for auditions and development for your acting career.

TP: Tell me a little about what you do to build your personal brand. 

BH: To build my personal brand I like to keep a strong online presence, most notably with Twitter and LinkedIn. I comment on finance and business aspects while also staying true to my arts/entertainment passion; I like to stay up to date with news. I also attend networking events CSU and the COB put on so I can constantly promote my personal brand: a passionate, always growing student.

TP: How do you balance the two things you are pursuing?

BH: I balance the two things by allocating my time during the day to my studies and the rest to theater. There is also never a bad time in between classes to memorize lines or learn a song. Acting and performing is such an amazing escape but still remains practical in business.

TP: Can you tell us a little about the audition process and how it compares to a job interview? 

BH: The audition process begins with a monologue in front of directors for every show for the semester. The directors then call you back specifically for their show to see where you can fit (for Evil Dead, we had to perform a song as well). After that, the directors post a cast list and rehearsals begin. The audition process relates to a job interview in the regard that both are trying to prove to someone why you will fit in and benefit their team (or show).  Whether that is with outstanding leadership in business or your characterization and ability to take direction in acting, both have the sole purpose of showing someone you can benefit them.

TP: What was your favorite part about performing in Evil Dead?

Image credit: Colorado State University

BH: My favorite part about performing in Evil Dead was playing such a zany character and being a part of such an amazing production. The special effects, props, projections, sounds, lights, they’re all amazing and something I have never seen before. It truly is an amazing show to watch and be a part of.

TP: What do you want to do when you graduate? 

BH: When I graduate, I would like to be associated with the arts/entertainment in some way.  I am studying accounting and finance, so integrating the two would be ideal; however, I am all about opportunities.

Hilzer is also a vocalist and pianist for the band Three Plus Me, which plays in various locations around Fort Collins, as well as a member of the Dean’s Student Leadership Council in the College of Business (as though he wasn’t already involved enough).

This weekend marks the final showings of “Evil Dead: The Musical,” and I highly recommend that you attend (unless you don’t do well with blood, that is). The production starts at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday at the University Center for the Arts. Tickets are available online.

Be bold – sit in the “splash zone,” and watch what a business student can do on the stage.

Business Day 2013

Business Day 2013By Tim Pate

I have to confess a secret – I’m not technically a business student. I’m actually a journalism student pursuing a business minor. (Perhaps this isn’t so much a secret; after all, it says so right in my biography.) Though I’m not a true business student in the strictest of terms, I am still immensely excited to attend Business Day 2013 on Wednesday, April 3 in the Lory Student Center Theatre.

This year’s theme is “Defying All Odds,” and the College of Business has enlisted some excellent speakers to motivate students of all backgrounds to conquer their personal obstacles. Whether or not you are a business student, the speakers at Business Day 2013 are sure to present material to which you can relate.

Take, for example, Aron Ralston, who will be presenting the final speech of the day. Ralston is a Colorado outdoorsman and motivational speaker, author of Between a Rock and a Hard Place, and the subject of the movie “127 Hours.” Ralston famously amputated his own arm in order to escape death in the Blue John Canyon of Utah after an 800-pound boulder pinned his arm against a canyon wall. Movie buffs and thrill-seekers alike should enjoy this presentation.

Another adventurer will join Ralston in the lineup of speakers for Business Day 2013 – Luiz Benitez. Benitez has summited Mount Everest six times, including a 2001 expedition with blind athlete Erik Weihenmayer. He also conducts an annual “Leadership and Change Management through Mountaineering” seminar in Ecuador and Chile for the University of Pennsylvania‘s Wharton School of Business, and he will share these incredible experiences with us.

If you want to learn about how business leaders and innovators have tackled problems, I suggest attending speeches by Dave and Gail Liniger, co-founders of RE/MAX; Chris Hutchins, sourcing partner with Google Ventures; and/or Hikmet Ersek, president and CEO of The Western Union Company.

The Linigers will discuss Dave’s battle with a septic staph infection that nearly took his life and how Gail managed to support Dave while continuing to lead RE/MAX.

Hutchins, a business graduate of Colorado State University, is the founder of LaidOffCamp, an initiative to help the unemployed learn new skills for the evolving job market in order to face their own challenges, and will discuss these experiences during his presentation.

Ersek will explain in his speech how in less than three years as CEO he was able to help The Western Union Company increase its retail money transfer business to more than 510,000 worldwide agent locations, expand into electronic and mobile channels, add a global cross-border business, and broaden its financial services product line to include stored value cards/e-wallets.

I chose to seek a business minor in addition to my degree in journalism because I knew that business knowledge would benefit me no matter what field I entered after college. I believe that same philosophy applies to Business Day, where I will get the chance to hear inspirational and reputable speakers share their knowledge. We all face challenges, and we all handle them differently. Maybe one of these speakers will say just the right thing to help you – or me – overcome current hindrances.

Below is a full schedule of events for Business Day 2013:

9:00 a.m. – Chris Hutchins, LSC Theatre

10:00 a.m. – Hikmet Ersek, LSC Theatre

11:00 a.m. – Dave and Gail Liniger, LSC Theatre

12:00 p.m. – Luis Benitez, LSC Theatre

2:00 p.m. – Aron Ralston, LSC Theatre

For more information, please visit http://biz.colostate.edu/newsEvents/Pages/eventDetails/businessDay13.aspx.

2013 Involvement Fair

SLiCE

by Tim Pate

I know I’ve said it before, but it deserves to be said again: getting involved with extracurricular organizations at Colorado State University is a great way to get the most out of your college experience. Student organizations are designed to complement your coursework and enhance your time at CSU, and there are literally hundreds of organizations that would love to have you.

That’s why you should stop by the 2013 Involvement Fair at the Lory Student Center, Wednesday, Jan. 30.

The Involvement Fair is an opportunity for CSU students to get involved on campus and in the community by connecting with student and community organizations. The Involvement Fair will feature dozens of organizations to match the interests of students with diverse backgrounds.

This semester, a number of business-oriented organizations are set to make an appearance, including BizMiss, DECA, and the Marketing Club. Following is a full list of registrants as of Jan. 29:

• 220 (formally The Net)

• Ability Club

• Alpha Phi Gamma

• Alpha Phi Omega

• ASCSU

• Beta Gamma Nu

• Biomedical Student Association

• BizMiss

• Brew Crew at CSU

• Christian Challenge

• Colorado State Shotgun Sports

• Dance Marathon

• Minecraft Club

• Science Fiction and Fantasy Club

• Snowboard Team

• DECA

• Delta Alpha Pi International Honor Society

• Fair Trade U

• Farmhouse Fraternity

• Fort Collins Rotaract

• Global Ambassadors Program

• Hillel: Foundation for Jewish Campus Life

• Hui O Hawaii

• Insideout Serve

• Japan Club

• Journal of Undergrad Research

• Lambda Theta Nu Sorority

• Leaders in Free Thought

• Lutheran Campus Ministry at CSU

• Marketing Club

• Nu Alpha Kappa Fraternity

• On the Bright Side

• OtterBox

• Pi Lambda Chi Latina Sorority

• Premedica

• Psi Chi/PSA

• Ram Runners

• Rams Organizing for Animal Rights

• SACNAS

• Sigma Alpha Epsilon

• Sigma Lambda Beta

• Sigma Lamda Gamma Sorority

• SLiCE

• Snowriders

• Social Work in Action

• Society for Conservation Biology

• Society of Global Health Researchers in Actions

• Students United for Reproductive Justice

• SURG

• Swim Club

• Team Handball

• TEDxCSU

• The Wildlife Society

• Theta Chi

• Timmy Global Health

• Triathlon Club

• Women in Physics

• Women’s Rugby

• Women’s Volleyball

• Young Americans for Liberty

 

Whether you want a club that corresponds with your studies or simply to find a group of people who share your interests, there exists an organization at CSU for you. Stop by the Lory Student Center today and connect with an organization.

Looking Forward to the Spring Semester

by Tim Pate

A new semester has begun at Colorado State University, and that means plenty to anticipate for CSU students. As the warm weather rolls around, students will get back in the rhythm of being a Ram full-time.

For freshman, this time of year means transitioning from apprehension at the prospect of new environments and challenges to excitement at embracing the next steps in a college career. At the other end of the spectrum, senior students realize that this is their last semester at CSU, which means charging into new territory come May. There are decisions to be made and opportunities to be had.

Spring semester at CSU is always a great time of year. The blossoming trees of the Oval never fail to provide a spectacle, and warmer days mean later nights spent on the intramural fields. It is also now that students begin thinking of their summer plans – be they visiting family, traveling or studying abroad, or staying in Fort Collins to work and take classes. Springtime shows students the multitude of possibilities ahead of them.

The College of Business too is alive with exciting prospects for students, faculty, and friends of the College. Events for students of all interests are on the horizon, as are career fairs and expos to get students connected with the business world. Keep your eyes open for opportunities to engage with the College of Business – the programs and events available are continuing to improve with each new semester.

This semester, you can look forward to these events and more:

Global Finance Summit

Friday, March 1, 2013
7:00 am – 1:45 p.m.
University Center for the Arts
Colorado State University
1400 Remington Street, Fort Collins, CO

Th­e Global Finance Summit will feature expert commentary and debate from financial professionals, economists, and academics on topics relating to the overall state of the global and domestic economy, fiscal and monetary policy, investment strategies, and business challenges.

Career Management Center Job and Internship Expo

Wednesday, February 6, 2013
4:30 – 6:30 p.m.
Rockwell Hall West, Atrium
Colorado State University
Fort Collins, CO

This event is an exclusive opportunity for employers to engage with College of Business student and alumni (closed event for Business Majors) in Rockwell West, the College’s state-of-the-art facility.  The event is smaller and more intimate, allowing recruiters more time to have meaningful interactions with our students.

Everitt Real Estate Center presents Mark Fleming: “Once a Hare, Now a Tortoise”

Wednesday, February 13, 2013
4 – 6:30 p.m.
Fort Collins Hilton
425 West Prospect Road, Fort Collins, CO

Mark Fleming will talk about what is in store as we head into the traditional buying season in the housing market in 2013, how the economy will fare given the political and fiscal situations, and whether housing will be as strong in 2013 as it was in 2012.

Make sure to check the College of Business website and to keep up with us on Facebook and Twitter to stay up-to-date on the latest happenings around the College – there are sure to be plenty.

Red, white, and blue balloon to make its second landing at CSU

For the second year in a row, Dave and Gail Liniger will make an appearance at Colorado State University to talk with and inspire students. Their area of expertise: real estate. The Linigers are the co-founders of the world’s top-producing real-estate network, RE/MAX, and they will be sharing their story with interested CSU students on November 29 at 10 a.m. in the Bohemian Auditorium.

Dave Liniger

Dave Liniger, co-founder of RE/MAX, speaking at CSU last year.

RE/MAX, which now boasts a network of more than 100,000 agents in 82 countries, was not always the successful company for which it is renowned today. You can expect Dave and Gail to share stories of their own failures and what they learned from their experiences. For example, Dave failed out of college – a result, he says, of having no goals. However, Dave would later go on to be named one of the “50 Most Powerful People in Real Estate” in 2010.

Gail Liniger

Gail Liniger, co-founder of RE/MAX, speaking at CSU last year

Gail too faced difficulties through the growing process of RE/MAX. While Dave was in charge of recruiting agents to get the company running, Gail maintained the duty of keeping their creditors at bay until they had the funds to pay their dues. But In 1989, Gail was awarded the “Entrepreneur of the Year Award” for the real estate and construction category in Colorado in 1989 by the international accounting firm Ernst & Young and Inc. Magazine. Hard work and perseverance always delivered for the Linigers in the end.

Tales of their struggles, triumphs, and more can be expected during their presentation. As a Denver-based company, RE/MAX has shown a tremendous amount of support in helping CSU to cultivate a culture conducive to the success of business and real estate students. Attending the event is free and open to students, and the College of Business highly encourages interested students to take advantage of this opportunity.

Giving Thanks

Next Thursday is Thanksgiving, and we at the College of Business have a lot for which to be thankful. Without the support and dedication of some terrific people and organizations, the College of Business would not be renowned program it is today. With that, we would like to take the time to thank some people who have helped build this college to be one of the best in the nation.

Our Students

CSU StudentsWith the right tools, any college can build the framework for a successful program. However, actually achieving success is impossible without hardworking students to make it happen. We believe that within the CSU College of Business you can find the nation’s best students, and they are at the heart of our program. Thank you students: for your hard work, your involvement, and your commitment to your school. We are consistently amazed by your accomplishments. Keep it up!

Our Faculty and Staff

In each of our five departments, you can find professors who are thought leaders in their fields. Their research continues to make an impact in the business world, and we are proud to have them at CSU. We are also excited by the stories we hear from students of professors going beyond their roles as researchers and teachers and becoming mentors. Our professors are dedicated to not only instilling knowledge in students but also building character and helping them reach their goals. Thank you to our professors for being so awesome!

Our Centers of Excellence

No matter what your interest in business, CSU’s College of Business has the programs and people to help you reach your goal. That’s why we’re so glad to have a number of centers dedicated to the specialized interests and aspirations of our undergraduate and graduate students. To the Beverage Business Institute, the Center for the Advancement of Social Enterprise, the Career Management Center, the Everitt Real Estate Center, the Center for Marketing & Social Issues, the Center for Professional Development & Business Research, the Tribal Technical Assistance Program, and the Institute for Entrepreneurship – thank you all for enriching our students’ experiences.

Colorado State University

Finally, we want to thank Colorado State University as a whole for…well…just about everything. From the students to the faculty and staff to the multitude of programs and organizations, everyone that works to make CSU a special place has gone above and beyond. Thank you all for doing what you do, and doing it so well.