A Different Kind of Relationship Building for February 14th

By Natalie Hansen

Valentine’s Day is quickly approaching and your time is probably spent thinking about what to do for that special someone. If you’re single, maybe you’re more focused on taking the day for yourself. Regardless of your love life status, as a business student you should take this time to reflect on a different type of relationship – the kind that sets you up for success.

You’ve probably heard the phrase “it’s all about who you know” more times than you’d like to remember. Cliché or not, it’s true – your education and work ethic are your solid (and necessary) foundation, but your network is how you eventually land that dream job, according to LinkedIn. Take this Valentine’s Day to implement the top five ways the CSU College of Business has developed to strengthen your network and lay the groundwork for your future:

1) Send “thank you” cards to professors, supervisors and other professionals who have helped you grow.

Networking expands your support system.

You’ve hopefully been able to use your college career to build relationships and find mentors whomyou admire. It’s not only about who you know – it’s also about who THEY know. Professors you’ve connected with, bosses who taught you valuable skills, and professionals you’ve met through classes and recruitment events all know numerous other people who may be your ticket to a great job. These are also the folks you want on your side when it comes time to ask for letters of recommendation. Choose a few who’ve made a great impact on you, and send a thank you card letting them know how they’ve helped you. Try for a hand-written note instead of an email. They’ll remember you and be willing to put in a good word for you when you need it.

2) Learn how to use LinkedIn to your advantage and update your profile.

LinkedIn is a necessity in your social media repertoire. Even when you have a steady job, maintaining your LinkedIn page can connect you with numerous other professionals. Those leaders you sent thank you cards to? Make sure you’ve added them on LinkedIn, and ask for a recommendation on your page. Use the site’s tools to upload examples of your work to your profile. Undercover Recruiter recommends staying active in groups and discussions, having a professional (no bathroom pictures, no pictures with pets) photo, and personalizing your URL.

3) Bring treats to work on Friday and show appreciation to co-workers.

Valentine’s Day is a source of major sales for the candy industry – Business Insider notes that Americans will spend over a billion dollars on sugar and chocolate this week. Use the excuse to indulge and bring treats to share with your co-workers. Co-workers can often be valuable references when applying for jobs. When they have a successful career, they’ll be able to connect you to valuable resources. Show your co-workers how much you appreciate them and make an impression by bringing in cookies, candy or baked goods (bonus points if they’re homemade).

4) Take care of yourself.

Taking time to de-stress is important; it can help make sure you’re in top form for your classes, internship, job and networking events. If you’ve been wanting to splurge on a massage, now is a great time. The Student Recreation Center has some affordable options. You can also treat yourself to weekend excursion out of town, extra time at the gym, your favorite dessert or even just some alone time with a good book. Whatever it is, carve out some time to relax.

5) Learn how to talk to recruiters on Thursday, Feb.13.

Students and recruiters mingle at the 2014 Spring Job and Internship Expo.

Knowing how to present yourself to recruiters and potential employers can be intimidating. You only get one chance at a first impression. Understanding how to put your best foot forward is important. The College of Business Career Management Center is offering some tips this Thursday, Feb. 13th. Learn how to talk to the companies and recruiters that visit campus at the Bohemian Auditorium in Rockwell Hall West from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

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As business students, the relationships you have in your network can make all the difference in your career. During this holiday for relationships, make time this week for your professional connections. What networking tips and tricks have you discovered?

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Sweet Servuction: Discovering the Business Behind a Corn Maze

By Ali Fisher

Halloween is a time filled with costumes, candy, and corn mazes. The Dean’s Student Leadership Council decided that visiting a local maze would be a fun first outing to work on team building and to have a little fall fun.

As we approached the line for the corn maze, we noticed a sign, “Corn Maze – Your Future Business.” Until that Saturday, the idea of owning a corn maze had never crossed my mind; however, when accompanied by a group of business students and a wait time of nearly 45 minutes, the conversation quickly went in that direction. Here’s what we determined after reflecting on our experience:

Your experience as a corn maze customer is a result of four components, known as the Servuction Model.

SModel

Other customers. By separating customers into smaller groups, it exposes consumers to two things —emotional behavior and bottlenecks. Before explaining that this buildup of people creates unnecessary time constraints, let’s examine the three types of emotional behavior exhibited from customers at corn mazes:

  • Emotional Involvement: These consumers are invested in the experience, actively engaging to prolong activity, and enjoying suspenseful areas throughout the maze.
  • Emotional Expressiveness: These are consumers who might scream, yell, or maybe even laugh outwardly to perceived scary and suspenseful events. Other consumers in this category may regret spending money on such childish activity and express regret in superficial emotion.
  • Emotional Intelligence: These consumers might as well give you a tour of the maze. They know when and where a service personnel is going to jump out and attempt to scare you. They can easily control their ability to be scared, but may take the fun out of the experience.

cornBottlenecks. Have you ever gotten stuck behind a group of slow individuals just when you were starting to figure out the right path? These are the bottlenecks. And this buildup of people is bound to impact your experience, according to the Servuction Model. They slow your experience right when you are on the edge of your triumphant finish. Is that the dilemma of the owner of the maze, or is it your problem? The company might want to consider making wider paths, admitting fewer people into the maze at once, increasing acreage and therefore expanding the maze, or reviewing the maze patterns to filter consumers in different areas using service personnel as key influencers.

Servicescape. This refers to the environment designed for the service. It includes two features — ambient conditions and physical evidence.

  • Ambient Conditions: Includes features such as the lighting, temperature, smells, sights, music, etc., by providing fog lights, ghost music, and increasing the specific aromas such as apple cider, the servicescape adds to the service experience of the consumer.
  • Physical Evidence: Encompasses features like signs, symbols, and artifacts. Objects such as the ticket booth, the website, and the design on the tickets need to clearly convey and enhance the maze operations; otherwise, discrepancies between the message provided and the message received may be a result of the servicescape.

Servicescape varies between corn mazes, but overall the components should seek to clearly align with the mission of the corn maze. Use this as an opportunity to set consumer expectations from the very beginning.

Service Personnel. This is what keeps people coming back and spreads positive word of mouth for a corn maze. If employees are not in character and do not scare customers, then they do not effectively accomplish the service paid for by consumers. Do they live by the mission of the organization? Do they live up to the level of fear one could expect when experiencing the maze? Service personnel not only interact with the consumers, but serve as an important source for product differentiation.

Organization and Systems. The rules, regulations, and processes implemented behind the scenes determine whether or not consumers will have a positive experience. This includes the proficiency of finances and how they are managed, whether or not human resource areas are controlled, the level of organization in the company’s systems, and performance standards that are in place. These components are not visible to the consumer, though they have a significant effect on consumers’ service experience.

With these four concepts in mind, consumers form perceptions regarding their corn maze experience. Are they satisfied, based on their expectations coming into the corn maze? As an owner, if you create a positive service experience,influential word of mouth, and buzz marketing campaigns, you can increase revenue as a result of increased customers.

Through this experience, I learned that business principles can be applied to everything – even corn mazes. With the right team and the right tools, any venture can be a successful one.

Special thanks to Marketing Professor, Doug Hoffman, for showing us all the power of servuction.

Happy Halloween, Business Rams!

8 Reasons to Attend the College of Business Job & Internship Exposition

By: Annie  Burnham

Welcome back, College of Business Rams! I hope your summer was relaxing, productive, and that you set and met some short-term goals. Now that the new semester has started, setting a few more short and long term goals (even if they are just in your head) is important to your success this semester.

One of your long term goals is probably to get a job after graduation. Well, there’s no time like the present to start working toward that goal. And here’s one of the best ways you can start – the College of Business Job & Internship Expo.

This event will be held on September 18 and 19 from 4-6 p.m. in the foyer of Rockwell West. The event is taking place two days in order to split up the concentrations. Marketing, Management, Master of Management Practice, Master of Business Administration, Global Social and Sustainable Enterprise Master of Business Administration students are invited to attend the Wednesday session, and

Computer Information Systems, Accounting, Finance, Real Estate, Master of Accountancy, and Master of Science in Business Administration for Computer information Systems, and Financial Risk Management, students are invited to attend Thursday. Register with the Career Management Center today.

Now, why should you go to this event, you ask?

The Career Management Center has eight good reasons students should attend.

  1. You can increase your network. 80% of jobs are found through a personal or professional connection. What better way to start making those connections than in an environment designed to cultivate those relationships? LinkedIn is a great vehicle for these relationships to be formed as well. The COB Job & Internship Expo hosts more than 50 employers and a number of great contacts that are looking for someone like you.
  2. It gives you a reason to dress your best. Your professional appearance makes a difference. Put on your nicest business attire to make a lasting impression. It is always better to be a little overdressed and show that you want to make a good impression rather than look like you decided attend this expo last minute.
  3. It is an opportunity to learn about a variety of companies. Take every opportunity to attend company or industry meetings, conferences, and events. The Job & Internship Expo provides you with a unique opportunity to have one-on-one conversations with a number of recruiters who can tell you firsthand what working with their organization is like. Come prepared with questions and research companies beforehand.
  4. Get a job/internship.  More than 50 employers will be in attendance. They are all seeking College of Business students. Start the career process early and meet with a number of companies one-on-one.
  5. Employers want to meet you. This one goes with No. 4. These employers will be prepared to conduct on the-spot interviews with the candidates who offer the best value to their organizations.
  6. Get a professional photo. Have your photo taken by a professional photographer to use on social media sites like LinkedIn. This is another reason dressing your best will be important. Your selfie in the bathroom mirror should NOT be your LinkedIn profile photo.
  7. Gain experience in career fair settings. Careers fairs can be intimidating – start early in college and learn the best ways to attract employers attention. You can also watch others interacting with employers and take some mental notes.
  8. Discover new companies and opportunities. Chances are you will not have heard of every company that is in attendance. This is a chance to find some companies that you might want to research later on about employment opportunities.

Although you might be a few semesters away from graduating, it is never too early to start thinking about what you want to move on to next. The Job & Internship Expo is a great way to meet new people and learn about opportunities to take advantage of now.

A Sendoff to the Class of 2013

By Tim Pate

College of Business graduates enjoy commencement

College of Business graduates enjoy commencement

This week’s post (by virtue of the title alone) runs the risk of being a bit sappy and sentimental, so I’ll do my best to keep it professional. You all have probably shed and seen enough tears for all the graduation hullabaloo,  and I don’t intend to contribute to the melancholy any more than I have to. That being said, here begins my blog post reflecting on my time as an undergraduate student at Colorado State University.

Two weeks ago, I sat in my room, putting the final touches on a school project, when I realized that the work I was completing was not just another college project – it was the final project. When it was done, there would be no more. For some reason, this simple fact hit me harder than all the well-wishings and congratulations I had received from family and friends in the preceding days and weeks. And suddenly I began to cherish that last project – I began to enjoy it.

This insignificant experience gave way to my realization of how representative my final project was of the conclusion of my college experience. Under any other circumstances, that project would have been just another part of college life – another small hurdle on my way to the finish line. On some level, I think that’s how I’ve viewed too much of my college experience. The classes, the events, the involvement, the mishaps were all part of a means to a grander end.

What this last project taught me was that I need to remember to take the time to appreciate those stepping stones that lead to the ultimate finale. Those awkward roommate situations freshman year; the nights spent in Old Town; the class presentations; the once-in-a-lifetime extracurricular events – all of these things were special in their own right.

Looking forward, I know that I will have the opportunity to take advantage of more small moments that culminate in something big. Life in the real world appears a bit daunting – I’ll admit that – and I know that I’m going to fail a few times before I find what works for me. However, I’m going to try to do my best to make my failings and my successes count and to take the time to acknowledge them individually.

There are a lot of naysayers out there who don’t believe in the potential of our generation. I think they’re wrong. I think that we’re going to make a difference that probably none of us can even foresee at the moment. But I hope that whatever happens along the way, we do our best to appreciate the little things that lead to whatever changes we make. I’m going to try to start appreciating those mundane class projects like I did the last one.

Congratulations to the Class of 2013!

Ben Hilzer on the Business of Theater and the Theatrics of Business

by Tim Pate

As you may have gleaned from this blog, I’m quite proud of the College of Business, from which I am earning a minor in business administration. However, I am also delighted to be a part of the College of Liberal Arts, where I am earning my degree in Journalism and Technical Communication. Both Colleges have incredible academic programs, and they each host activities and events that enhance the college experience for their students.

Ben Hilzer
Image credit: Ben Hilzer

Enter Ben Hilzer, a junior accounting and finance student in the College of Business, who lives at the intersection of these two colleges. In addition to being a fervent business student, Hilzer is also a self-proclaimed thespian and played the character “Jake” in Colorado State University’s production of “Evil Dead: The Musical.” I saw the R-rated show on opening night and laughed myself to tears. Hilzer’s character is a tobacco-spittin’ hillbilly with surprisingly good singing abilities, and he was one of the highlights of the show.

Hilzer’s Twitter feed is an eclectic combination of his thoughts on business, theater, sports, and music. He displays such enthusiasm for these areas of his life; I knew his perspective would be an interesting one for this blog. So, I caught up with Hilzer a couple days ago to talk about his unique dedication to business and the arts. Here is our exchange:

TP: What has being in Evil Dead taught you about business, and vice versa?

BH: Being in “Evil Dead: The Musical,” as well as theater in general, has shown me the distinct overlap between business and theater. Most notably, the importance of your personal brand. In business, we try to develop our personal brand for job interviews and career building; similarly in theater, your personal brand is crucial for auditions and development for your acting career.

TP: Tell me a little about what you do to build your personal brand. 

BH: To build my personal brand I like to keep a strong online presence, most notably with Twitter and LinkedIn. I comment on finance and business aspects while also staying true to my arts/entertainment passion; I like to stay up to date with news. I also attend networking events CSU and the COB put on so I can constantly promote my personal brand: a passionate, always growing student.

TP: How do you balance the two things you are pursuing?

BH: I balance the two things by allocating my time during the day to my studies and the rest to theater. There is also never a bad time in between classes to memorize lines or learn a song. Acting and performing is such an amazing escape but still remains practical in business.

TP: Can you tell us a little about the audition process and how it compares to a job interview? 

BH: The audition process begins with a monologue in front of directors for every show for the semester. The directors then call you back specifically for their show to see where you can fit (for Evil Dead, we had to perform a song as well). After that, the directors post a cast list and rehearsals begin. The audition process relates to a job interview in the regard that both are trying to prove to someone why you will fit in and benefit their team (or show).  Whether that is with outstanding leadership in business or your characterization and ability to take direction in acting, both have the sole purpose of showing someone you can benefit them.

TP: What was your favorite part about performing in Evil Dead?

Image credit: Colorado State University

BH: My favorite part about performing in Evil Dead was playing such a zany character and being a part of such an amazing production. The special effects, props, projections, sounds, lights, they’re all amazing and something I have never seen before. It truly is an amazing show to watch and be a part of.

TP: What do you want to do when you graduate? 

BH: When I graduate, I would like to be associated with the arts/entertainment in some way.  I am studying accounting and finance, so integrating the two would be ideal; however, I am all about opportunities.

Hilzer is also a vocalist and pianist for the band Three Plus Me, which plays in various locations around Fort Collins, as well as a member of the Dean’s Student Leadership Council in the College of Business (as though he wasn’t already involved enough).

This weekend marks the final showings of “Evil Dead: The Musical,” and I highly recommend that you attend (unless you don’t do well with blood, that is). The production starts at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday at the University Center for the Arts. Tickets are available online.

Be bold – sit in the “splash zone,” and watch what a business student can do on the stage.

Business Day 2013

Business Day 2013By Tim Pate

I have to confess a secret – I’m not technically a business student. I’m actually a journalism student pursuing a business minor. (Perhaps this isn’t so much a secret; after all, it says so right in my biography.) Though I’m not a true business student in the strictest of terms, I am still immensely excited to attend Business Day 2013 on Wednesday, April 3 in the Lory Student Center Theatre.

This year’s theme is “Defying All Odds,” and the College of Business has enlisted some excellent speakers to motivate students of all backgrounds to conquer their personal obstacles. Whether or not you are a business student, the speakers at Business Day 2013 are sure to present material to which you can relate.

Take, for example, Aron Ralston, who will be presenting the final speech of the day. Ralston is a Colorado outdoorsman and motivational speaker, author of Between a Rock and a Hard Place, and the subject of the movie “127 Hours.” Ralston famously amputated his own arm in order to escape death in the Blue John Canyon of Utah after an 800-pound boulder pinned his arm against a canyon wall. Movie buffs and thrill-seekers alike should enjoy this presentation.

Another adventurer will join Ralston in the lineup of speakers for Business Day 2013 – Luiz Benitez. Benitez has summited Mount Everest six times, including a 2001 expedition with blind athlete Erik Weihenmayer. He also conducts an annual “Leadership and Change Management through Mountaineering” seminar in Ecuador and Chile for the University of Pennsylvania‘s Wharton School of Business, and he will share these incredible experiences with us.

If you want to learn about how business leaders and innovators have tackled problems, I suggest attending speeches by Dave and Gail Liniger, co-founders of RE/MAX; Chris Hutchins, sourcing partner with Google Ventures; and/or Hikmet Ersek, president and CEO of The Western Union Company.

The Linigers will discuss Dave’s battle with a septic staph infection that nearly took his life and how Gail managed to support Dave while continuing to lead RE/MAX.

Hutchins, a business graduate of Colorado State University, is the founder of LaidOffCamp, an initiative to help the unemployed learn new skills for the evolving job market in order to face their own challenges, and will discuss these experiences during his presentation.

Ersek will explain in his speech how in less than three years as CEO he was able to help The Western Union Company increase its retail money transfer business to more than 510,000 worldwide agent locations, expand into electronic and mobile channels, add a global cross-border business, and broaden its financial services product line to include stored value cards/e-wallets.

I chose to seek a business minor in addition to my degree in journalism because I knew that business knowledge would benefit me no matter what field I entered after college. I believe that same philosophy applies to Business Day, where I will get the chance to hear inspirational and reputable speakers share their knowledge. We all face challenges, and we all handle them differently. Maybe one of these speakers will say just the right thing to help you – or me – overcome current hindrances.

Below is a full schedule of events for Business Day 2013:

9:00 a.m. – Chris Hutchins, LSC Theatre

10:00 a.m. – Hikmet Ersek, LSC Theatre

11:00 a.m. – Dave and Gail Liniger, LSC Theatre

12:00 p.m. – Luis Benitez, LSC Theatre

2:00 p.m. – Aron Ralston, LSC Theatre

For more information, please visit http://biz.colostate.edu/newsEvents/Pages/eventDetails/businessDay13.aspx.

Win a CSU Hoodie When You Take Spring Break Photos with Flat Cam

Are you heading somewhere exotic for Spring Break? Or are you driving to the mountains for a week of snow sports? Maybe you’re just kicking it in Fort Collins and catching up on sleep. Whatever your plans for next week, make sure to bring Flat Cam along – and you could win a free CSU hoodie.

All you have to do is download Flat Cam here and cut him out, take a picture with Cam enjoying your Spring Break festivities, and submit your photo to news@biz.colostate.edu. A winner will be selected and notified by Friday, March 29.

All CSU students and alumni are invited to participate. Have a wonderful Spring Break, and be sure to share your adventures with the College of Business!

The Inaugural Global Finance Summit

by Annie Burnham

Panelists respond to questions at the inaugural Global Finance Summit.

Panelists respond to questions at the inaugural Global Finance Summit.

Last Friday, the Department of Finance and Real Estate held its inaugural Global Finance Summit. The event drew 180 people to Colorado State University’s Center for the Arts for an impressive lineup of 10 speakers. Student moderators asked panels of speakers questions in three sessions. Each session had a specific topic: the global economy, moderated by Zachary Lund and Eric Ziola; alternative investment strategies, moderated by David Ferguson and Jason Page; and corporate finance challenges, moderated by Amy Sunderman and Jessica Blakeman.

The keynote speaker was Alice Schroeder. Schroeder spoke about the various interactions she had with Warren Buffett in writing her book, The Snowball. She recounted the life experiences and life-wisdom of Warren Buffett and talked about his business acumen (strong negotiation tactics), family relationships, and personal traits.

The event was great and very educational. Although many topics were covered, the opinions shared were very enlightening and everyone seemed to enjoy the event. After each of the three sessions, participants gathered for networking and snacks in the lobby outside the theater.

As a member of the audience, I felt that the event achieved all the Department of Finance and Real Estate had hoped. For those six students who participated as moderators, this was a wonderful opportunity to engage with some brilliant minds in finance and economics. The moderators all agreed that the first ever Global Finance Summit was a success.

Student moderators asked expert panelists questions.

Student moderators asked expert panelists questions.

Zachary Lund, senior business administration major and a member of the Colorado CFA Society Global Research Challenge team that placed first in Denver last month, was one of the first moderators. He and his co-moderator, Eric Ziola, asked questions pertaining to the global economy. Lund mentioned that he and Ziola “prepared by organizing questions, coordinating with the speakers via conference calls, doing research on the subject matter, and practicing discussions about the subject matter.”

Eric Ziola, a senior studying finance and real estate, said, “It was an unbelievable opportunity, and I know that some students were approached by employers in the industry.”

Events such as this one tend to invite employers to meet prospective employees among the CSU business students. Ziola offered advice to younger CSU business students: “Take part in every opportunity and event related to your field while you are in school, because the chance to talk to industry professionals will disappear once you enter the ‘real world.’ There are barriers preventing access to these wonderful industry professionals that the college breaks down for you.”

“Students should understand that opportunities like the GFS are extremely valuable and present the opportunity to get real world insight in order to bridge the academic value of the college experience with its actual application in the business world,” Lund echoed. “These opportunities do not happen all that often and should be capitalized on by students.”

Top Three Reasons to Attend the College of Business Career Expo

By Annie Burnham

Tomorrow, February 6, the Career Management Center is hosting their semi-annual College of Business Job and Internship Expo. From 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. join more than 50 different companies for networking in the Rockwell West Atrium. Why, may you ask, should you take advantage of this? Because graduation will be upon us before you know it and looking for potential jobs now will save you a lot of stress later. And if that isn’t enough to convince you, here are the top three reasons why you should sign up to attend the Career Expo tomorrow:

  1. Distribute your Résumé: You have the potential to get your résumé submitted for dozens of jobs. This will require you to do some research tonight and tomorrow morning. The Career Management Center has a list of the employers coming, so go ahead and browse the ones that appeal to you. See what positions they have open that you can fill. You might have to tailor your résumé a bit for specific positions but the fact that you prepared ahead will demonstrate your attention to detail.
  2. Networking Potential: Not only will this help with your possibilities for careers but also it will allow you to explore different options to meet your needs and interests. The more network connections you have, the more likely you are to get a job after graduation. The saying “It’s all about who you know” nine times out of ten is correct. Be confident and assert yourself. What do you have to lose?
  3. Free LinkedIn pictures: You will already be dressed up to present yourself to companies, so you are bound to look professional in your LinkedIn profile picture. This will help your page viewers see that you are able to present a professional image of yourself. Updating your LinkedIn page often is a good plan to increase your chances for landing a job.

2013 Involvement Fair

SLiCE

by Tim Pate

I know I’ve said it before, but it deserves to be said again: getting involved with extracurricular organizations at Colorado State University is a great way to get the most out of your college experience. Student organizations are designed to complement your coursework and enhance your time at CSU, and there are literally hundreds of organizations that would love to have you.

That’s why you should stop by the 2013 Involvement Fair at the Lory Student Center, Wednesday, Jan. 30.

The Involvement Fair is an opportunity for CSU students to get involved on campus and in the community by connecting with student and community organizations. The Involvement Fair will feature dozens of organizations to match the interests of students with diverse backgrounds.

This semester, a number of business-oriented organizations are set to make an appearance, including BizMiss, DECA, and the Marketing Club. Following is a full list of registrants as of Jan. 29:

• 220 (formally The Net)

• Ability Club

• Alpha Phi Gamma

• Alpha Phi Omega

• ASCSU

• Beta Gamma Nu

• Biomedical Student Association

• BizMiss

• Brew Crew at CSU

• Christian Challenge

• Colorado State Shotgun Sports

• Dance Marathon

• Minecraft Club

• Science Fiction and Fantasy Club

• Snowboard Team

• DECA

• Delta Alpha Pi International Honor Society

• Fair Trade U

• Farmhouse Fraternity

• Fort Collins Rotaract

• Global Ambassadors Program

• Hillel: Foundation for Jewish Campus Life

• Hui O Hawaii

• Insideout Serve

• Japan Club

• Journal of Undergrad Research

• Lambda Theta Nu Sorority

• Leaders in Free Thought

• Lutheran Campus Ministry at CSU

• Marketing Club

• Nu Alpha Kappa Fraternity

• On the Bright Side

• OtterBox

• Pi Lambda Chi Latina Sorority

• Premedica

• Psi Chi/PSA

• Ram Runners

• Rams Organizing for Animal Rights

• SACNAS

• Sigma Alpha Epsilon

• Sigma Lambda Beta

• Sigma Lamda Gamma Sorority

• SLiCE

• Snowriders

• Social Work in Action

• Society for Conservation Biology

• Society of Global Health Researchers in Actions

• Students United for Reproductive Justice

• SURG

• Swim Club

• Team Handball

• TEDxCSU

• The Wildlife Society

• Theta Chi

• Timmy Global Health

• Triathlon Club

• Women in Physics

• Women’s Rugby

• Women’s Volleyball

• Young Americans for Liberty

 

Whether you want a club that corresponds with your studies or simply to find a group of people who share your interests, there exists an organization at CSU for you. Stop by the Lory Student Center today and connect with an organization.